Navigating the future

In recent years, the world has seen an increasing number of transformation-triggered events, from climate and other natural disasters, to epidemics, pandemics and a pending global war. The accumulated impact of these events will disrupt (yes, there are still systems that can be disrupted more) every aspect of our societal and economical landscapes. Managing these events as they come will strain our capacity. While facing the aftermath of the global Corona pandemic crisis and the upcoming energy and economic challenges, we need to realize that it is just a matter of time before the next event, one with potentially even greater catastrophic consequences. A severe event, which becomes an Opportunity for Change (OfC) Event, requires substantial cooperation among industries, civil authorities, and key international organizations.

To be able and brace the unknown, organizations, and governments must first accept that fact that they can’t escape the impact—evolution in driven by disruptions. Even if the result of the upcoming event will be half of what some predict them to be, it’s obvious that it’s going to be enough of a disruption to affect our political, societal, economical and technological landscape.

Second, it’s obvious that the emergence of a new economic landscape will drive the majority of changes. The dominance of the Dollar empire is fading away—and the more we try to fight the inevitable, the more the noose will tighten against our necks. This process didn’t start with the current war in Ukraine, or it’s a carry on from the days of Covid. The stage was set already in 2001 when Jim O’Neill coins the term BRIC. Jim O’Neill didn’t design BRIC, but rather simply gave it a name. The design itself was the result of the USA and Europe thought-fixations that they are of immune from disruption.

The emergence of a new economic landscape will not eliminate the current one, as it’s even set on the same playing filed—there lies the current system problem. While the leaders of the USA and Europe try to drive new values to their systems, The BRIC model is creating a new impact. Think about it this way—the iPhone is a direct decedent of the impact line created by the Gutenberg press (i.e., giving society access to information) and Tesla is a direct decedent of the Roman horse and carriage impact line. The new model is a result of an entirely new impact line.

This disruption is not the end as the media and some leaders like to portray it, but rather an Opportunity for Change. It’s not a bout choosing a side, but about figuring out what is the best next move for your organization, your government. It’s about cooperation rather than dictation. Situation are driven by their potentials. What we need to understand that there is a big difference between fighting the future and navigating it.

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